Comparison of Self-Directed Learning Versus Instructor-Modeled Learning During a Simulated Clinical Experience

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Abstract

Background:

There are no reports in the literature that compare instructor-modeled learning to self-directed learning when simulation is used. Therefore, no evidence exists to know which approach is superior. This study aims to test the hypothesis that instructor-modeled learning is more effective compared with self-directed learning during a simulated clinical experience.

Methods:

This is a descriptive pilot study to compare instructor-modeled learning with self-directed learning during a clinical simulated experience. Four evaluation tools were used at three time points to evaluate knowledge, self-efficacy (self confidence), and behaviors.

Results:

Sixteen students participated. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups on the Knowledge Assessment Test. There were significant differences between the groups in the Self-Efficacy Tool (SET) at three times (time 1: P = 0.006, time 2: P = 0.008, time 3: P = 0.012). The only significance between the groups on the Technical Evaluation Tool was time to start Albuterol. The Behavioral Assessment Tool (BAT) showed significant differences between the groups in 8 out of 10 components of the tool. A strong correlation was observed between the overall score of the BAT and the SET Score.

Conclusion:

Although the small sample size prohibits definitive conclusions, the data suggest that instructor-modeled learning may be more effective than self-directed learning for some aspects of learning during a clinical simulated experience.

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