Nurse Satisfaction With Medical Emergency Team Nurses: A 3-Year Study

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Abstract

Background

This 3-year study measured the satisfaction of staff nurses with medical emergency team (MET) nurse services at a 573-bed hospital in the south from 2015 through 2017. Nurse satisfaction is a key management issue. Barriers to effective MET use can negatively impact patient outcomes, staffing, and nurse turnover.

Objectives

The purpose of this study was to assess nurse satisfaction with MET nurses at a large county hospital in the south over a 3-year period.

Methods

Satisfaction was analyzed by shift, nurse role, the number of times the nurse contacted the MET nurse, and the way in which contact was initiated (MET nurse initiated vs nurse initiated). In addition, nurses responded to open-ended questions.

Results

Nurse satisfaction with MET nurse services was improved with both education and communication over time and stabilized over the 3-year period. More than 95% of nurses were satisfied or very satisfied overall with MET nurse services. There were statistically significant differences in satisfaction by shift worked, nurse role, and method of activation. There were no statistically significant differences by nursing floor.

Discussion

Nurse leaders can consider this MET nurse service as a potential model to help with increasing staff satisfaction, staff engagement, and, potentially, staff retention. More than 95% of nurses were satisfied or very satisfied overall with MET nurse services.

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