Bio-Thiersch as an Adjunct to Perineal Proctectomy Reduces Rates of Recurrent Rectal Prolapse

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Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The rates of recurrent prolapse after perineal proctectomy vary widely in the literature, with incidences ranging between 0% and 50%. The Thiersch procedure, first described in 1891 for the treatment of rectal prolapse, involves encircling the anus with a foreign material with the goal of confining the prolapsing rectum above the anus. The Bio-Thiersch procedure uses biological mesh for anal encirclement and can be used as an adjunct to perineal proctectomy for rectal prolapse to reduce recurrence.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to evaluate the Bio-Thiersch procedure as an adjunct to perineal proctectomy and its impact on recurrence compared with perineal proctectomy alone.

DESIGN:

A retrospective review of consecutive patients undergoing perineal proctectomy with and without Bio-Thiersch was performed.

SETTINGS:

Procedures took place in the Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery at a tertiary academic teaching hospital.

PATIENTS:

Patients who had undergone perineal proctectomy and those who received perineal proctectomy with Bio-Thiersch were evaluated and compared.

INTERVENTIONS:

All of the patients with rectal prolapse received perineal proctectomy with levatorplasty, and a proportion of those patients had a Bio-Thiersch placed as an adjunct.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The incidence of recurrent rectal prolapse after perineal proctectomy alone or perineal proctectomy with Bio-Thiersch was documented.

RESULTS:

Sixty-two patients underwent perineal proctectomy (8 had a previous prolapse procedure), and 25 patients underwent perineal proctectomy with Bio-Thiersch (12 had a previous prolapse procedure). Patients who received perineal proctectomy with Bio-Thiersch had a lower rate of recurrent rectal prolapse (p < 0.05) despite a higher proportion of them having had a previous prolapse procedure (p < 0.01). Perineal proctectomy with Bio-Thiersch had a lower recurrence over time versus perineal proctectomy alone (p < 0.05).

LIMITATIONS:

This study was limited by nature of being a retrospective review.

CONCLUSIONS:

Bio-Thiersch as an adjunct to perineal proctectomy may reduce the risk for recurrent rectal prolapse and can be particularly effective in patients with a history of previous failed prolapse procedures.

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