Doll therapy: A therapeutic means to meet past attachment needs and diminish behaviours of concern in a person living with dementia - a case study approach


    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

The aim of this research study was to examine the impact of the provision of a lifelike baby doll as a therapeutic tool on the behaviour of a person living with dementia. Specifically, this single case study assessed the potential benefits, if any, of the use of doll therapy in reducing behaviours of concern such as anxiety and agitation that may be associated with observed attachment needs of a person living with dementia.Method:A single case study of a female participant, with moderately advanced Alzheimer's disease, was the subject of this research. The case study used both qualitative and quantitative research design and methodology in data collection and analysis.Results:Demonstrated that doll therapy was a positive intervention for the person living with dementia who was the participant in this research. The findings indicate a reduction in behaviours of concern related to the need for attachment and a considerable decline in levels of anxiety and agitation. There was extensive ongoing improvement in social interaction and communication.Conclusion:This research supports doll therapy as a therapeutic intervention that may be utilized within the ongoing care of some persons with dementia to meet needs for attachment and to reduce behaviours of concern. Despite some controversy on this topic, doll therapy should be considered as a therapeutic approach to further dementia care in light of this positive outcome.

    loading  Loading Related Articles