RACE AND RELIGION: DIFFERENTIAL PREDICTION OF ANXIETY SYMPTOMS BY RELIGIOUS COPING IN AFRICAN AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN AMERICAN YOUNG ADULTS


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Abstract

Background:Psychosocial factors, including religious coping, consistently have been implicated in the expression of anxiety disorders. This study sought to investigate the relationship between religious coping on anxiety symptoms among a nonclinical sample of African American and European American young adults.Methods:One hundred twenty-one European American and 100 African American young adults completed measures of anxiety and religious coping.Results:As predicted, results differed according to race. African Americans reported significantly more positive religious coping, less negative religious coping, and experienced fewer anxiety symptoms than European Americans. European Americans demonstrated a significant, positive relationship between negative religious coping and anxiety symptoms, and an opposite trend related to anxiety and positive religious coping. However, no such relationships emerged among the African American sample.Conclusions:Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

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