COMORBID ANXIETY AS A DIFFERENTIAL TREATMENT PREDICTOR FOR TELEPHONE VERSUS FACE-TO-FACE ADMINISTERED COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY FOR DEPRESSION


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Abstract

Background:The present study examines the role of comorbid anxiety on depression outcomes for those receiving cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression by telephone (T-CBT) or face-to-face (FtF-CBT).Methods:Three hundred twenty-five participants were randomized to T-CBT or FtF-CBT. Comorbid anxiety was measured using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview and Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7. Depression was measured using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and Patient Health Questionnaire 9.Results:A hierarchical model including the two-way interaction of treatment assignment and anxiety status indicated a significant effect for all outcome variables (Ps < .05). Post hoc t tests indicated T-CBT participants with comorbid anxiety disorders had significantly higher symptom severity over time compared to their T-CBT counterparts without anxiety (Ps < .001) and FtF-CBT counterparts with comorbid anxiety (Ps < .003). There were no significant differences in outcomes between those with and without comorbid anxiety disorders receiving FtF-CBT, or between T-CBT and FtF-CBT among those without comorbid anxiety disorders.Conclusions:The findings indicate that the presence of baseline anxiety impacts the overall effect of T-CBT for the treatment of depression.

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