PATENCY OF THE ACCESSORY PANCREATIC DUCT EVALUATED BY DYE-INJECTION ENDOSCOPIC RETROGRADE PANCREATOGRAPHY: METHODS AND CLINICAL IMPLICATION

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

The accessory pancreatic duct (APD) is sometimes developmentally obliterated near the duodenum. We evaluated patency of the APD by dye-injection endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP). We injected 2–3 mL contrast medium containing indigocarmine into the main pancreatic duct (MPD) via a selectively cannulated endoscopic catheter. Patency of the APD was evaluated by observing the excretion of dye from the minor duodenal papilla. Of the 291 control cases studied, 43% demonstrated a patent APD. Patency of the APD in patients with acute pancreatitis was only 17%, significantly lower than that of controls (P < 0.01). Mean caliber of patent APD was 1.6 ± 0.5 mm, significantly greater than the 1.1 ± 0.5 mm of non-patent APD (P < 0.01). Regarding the terminal shape of the APD, spindle- and cudgel-type APD were frequently patent (93% and 88%, respectively, (P < 0.01). With respect to APD course, long-type APD showed most frequent patency (75%, P < 0.01). Dye-injection ERP represents a simple and definitive method for examining APD function. A patent APD may prevent acute pancreatitis by reducing pressure in the MPD. Patency of the APD might be dependent on duct caliber, course, and terminal shape.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles