The Windsock Syndrome: Subpulmonic Obstruction by Membranous Ventricular Septal Aneurysm in Congenitally Corrected Transposition of Great Arteries

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Anomalies of the membranous portion of the interventricular septum include perimembranous ventricular septal defect and/or membranous septal aneurysm (MSA). In congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (L-TGA in sinus solitus), the combination of ventricular inversion and arterial transposition creates a unique anatomic substrate that fosters subpulmonic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction by an MSA. The combination of an L-TGA with subpulmonic obstruction by an MSA is referred to as the windsock syndrome. We report a case of windsock syndrome in a 25-year-old man which is to our knowledge the first three-dimensional echocardiographic description of this congenital entity.

Mini-Abstract

We report a case of a 25-year-old man with windsock syndrome, a combination of a congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (L-TGA in sinus solitus) and subpulmonic obstruction by a membranous septal aneurysm (MSA). Anomalies of the membranous portion of the interventricular septum include perimembranous ventricular septal defect and/or MSA. The combination of ventricular inversion and arterial transposition in L-TGA creates a unique anatomic substrate that fosters subpulmonic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction by an MSA. This case is to our knowledge the first three-dimensional echocardiographic description of windsock syndrome.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles