S100B protein and neuron-specific enolase as predictors of cognitive dysfunction after coronary artery bypass graft surgery: A prospective observational study

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Abstract

BACKGROUND

Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) may be related to the systemic inflammatory response and an increase in serum markers of brain injury such as S100B protein and neuron-specific enolase (NSE).

OBJECTIVE

The study aims to evaluate the association between POCD and serum levels of S100B and NSE after coronary artery bypass grafting surgery (CABG).

DESIGN

Prospective observational study.

SETTING

Single university teaching hospital.

PATIENTS

We investigated 88 patients undergoing CABG.

MAIN OUTCOMES MEASURES

Cognitive function was measured preoperatively, and at the 21st and 180th postoperative days (i.e. 6 months after surgery). S100B protein and NSE serum levels were evaluated preoperatively, after induction of anaesthesia, at the end of surgery and at 6 and 24 h after surgery.

RESULTS

The incidence of POCD was 26.1% at 21 days after surgery and 22.7% at 6 months after surgery. Increased serum levels of S100B protein and NSE were observed postoperatively and may indicate brain damage.

CONCLUSION

Although serum levels of S100B protein and NSE are both significantly increased postoperatively, our findings indicate that serum levels of S100B protein may be more accurate than NSE in the detection of POCD after CABG.

TRIAL REGISTRATION

NCT01550159.

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