A reference equation for maximal aerobic power for treadmill and cycle ergometer exercise testing: Analysis from the FRIEND registry

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Background

Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) is a powerful predictor of health outcomes. Valid and portable reference values are integral to interpreting measured VO2max; however, available reference standards lack validation and are specific to exercise mode. This study was undertaken to develop and validate a single equation for normal standards for VO2max for the treadmill or cycle ergometer in men and women.

Methods

Healthy individuals (N = 10,881; 67.8% men, 20–85 years) who performed a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test on either a treadmill or a cycle ergometer were studied. Of these, 7617 and 3264 individuals were randomly selected for development and validation of the equation, respectively. A Brazilian sample (1619 individuals) constituted a second validation cohort. The prediction equation was determined using multiple regression analysis, and comparisons were made with the widely-used Wasserman and European equations.

Results

Age, sex, weight, height and exercise mode were significant predictors of VO2max. The regression equation was: VO2max (ml kg–1 min–1) = 45.2 – 0.35*Age – 10.9*Sex (male = 1; female = 2) – 0.15*Weight (pounds) + 0.68*Height (inches) – 0.46*Exercise Mode (treadmill = 1; bike = 2) (R = 0.79, R2 = 0.62, standard error of the estimate = 6.6 ml kg–1 min–1). Percentage predicted VO2max for the US and Brazilian validation cohorts were 102.8% and 95.8%, respectively. The new equation performed better than traditional equations, particularly among women and individuals ≥60 years old.

Conclusion

A combined equation was developed for normal standards for VO2max for different exercise modes derived from a US national registry. The equation provided a lower average error between measured and predicted VO2max than traditional equations even when applied to an independent cohort. Additional studies are needed to determine its portability.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles