Attitudes and perceptions of influenza vaccination among Hong Kong doctors and medical students before the 2009 pandemic

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Background: Vaccination is an important preventive measure for preparing against the influenza pandemics. This study investigated the attitudes and perceptions of influenza vaccination among doctors and medical students in Hong Kong. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 204 doctors and 242 medical students in a teaching hospital in 2009. Participants’ demographic and job characteristics, and influenza experience and vaccination in the previous year were assessed in the questionnaire. Logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between uptake of influenza vaccination and the perceived benefits. Results: Medical students were more likely to have receive an influenza vaccination in the previous year (66.9 vs. 39.7%) and acknowledged the related benefits than doctors. Moreover, uptake of influenza vaccine was associated with perceived benefits of vaccination in both doctors and medical students. Conclusions: The perceived benefits of influenza vaccination are an important factor in vaccine uptake for both doctors and medical students in Hong Kong, and should be reinforced in the professional training.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles