SWEET ON THE OUTSIDE BUT NOT ON THE INSIDE -LIQUITAB INJURIES IN A TERTIARY PAEDIATRIC EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT (PED)

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Abstract

Objectives & Background

Following the near fatal aspiration of a liquitab in RBHSC, a review of the department's management of this increasingly common issue was undertaken.

Objectives & Background

The aims of the audit were:

Objectives & Background

1) Identify the frequency of liquitab injuries

Objectives & Background

2) Assess the range of injuries caused by liquitabs

Methods

The electronic system uses to register and track patients (Symphony) was used to collect the data. Data was reviewed for the years 2012/2013. Cases were included only if the injury was due to a liquitab.

Results

275 cases were identified from the preliminary search. 40 of these were documented liquitab injuries (15% of non-medicinal ingestions).

Results

Type of injury:

Results

Ingestion – 28/40 (70%) and eye injury – 12/40 (30%). No children had inhalation or skin injury noted.

Results

Ingestion

Results

–17/28 (60%) of these patients presented with vomiting. Treatment was supportive in all cases.

Results

Eye injury

Results

Outcome

Results

Explanation of injury: Unsupervised play in 37.5% (15/40) with the remainder not documented.275 cases were identified from the preliminary search. 40 of these were documented liquitab injuries (15% of non-medicinal ingestions).

Conclusion

The results highlight the difficulties that children can encounter from liquitab injuries. The colourful nature, “sweet-like” appearance and soft texture of liquitab detergents make them appealing to young children. A key issue was to improve parental awareness. We have achieved this via a national press release through Rospa,(Royal Society of the Prevention of Accidents), BBC news interviews and national press articles.

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