BASAL AND BOLUS INSULIN REQUIREMENTS IN CHILDREN, ADOLESCENTS, AND YOUNG ADULTS WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS ON CONTINUOUS SUBCUTANEOUS INSULIN INFUSION (CSII): EFFECTS OF AGE AND PUBERTY

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Abstract

Objective:

Guidelines for insulin dosing, including the insulin to carbohydrate ratio (I/C), insulin sensitivity factor (ISF), and basal/bolus ratio guidelines, have been well established for adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, clinical experience suggests that these guidelines are not appropriate for children. The purpose of this study was to determine the continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) settings in children with T1DM at different ages and stages of puberty.

Methods:

A total of 154 patients data between the ages of 3 and 21 years with well-controlled T1DM according to American Diabetes Association guidelines were reviewed. Only patients on CSII who were not in the honeymoon period were included.

Results:

Patients were divided into 8 groups according to age, gender, and/or pubertal stage. Insulin requirements increased with puberty in both sexes (0.69, 0.97, and 0.90 U/kg/day in children <7 years of age, midpu-bertal girls, and late-pubertal boys, respectively). Basal insulin requirement was lowest in the youngest group (34%; P<.01). The youngest group had the lowest I/C prediction factor (PF) (mean, 315.7 ± 79.4; P<.01 with all groups), and the ISF-PF was higher than that of the oldest group (mean, 2,588.3 ± 1,101.8; P<.01).

Conclusion:

CSII dose calculations vary with age and pubertal status in children with T1DM. These differences must be considered when calculating CSII dosing, especially for younger children. (Endocr Pract. 2013; 19:805–811)

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