The role of the sympathetic nervous system in the resuscitative effect of stimulating the central serotonin 1A receptors in haemorrhagic shock in rats

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Abstract

Haemorrhagic shock is a life threatening condition, and, as such, it is important to understand the mechanisms taking part in its reversal. In the 1990s, it was shown that activation of serotonin 1A receptors is responsible for the circulatory decompensation and development of the sympathoinhibitory phase. In previous reports, it was demonstrated that activation of serotonin 1A receptors induces resuscitative effects in haemorrhaged rats. However, the effectory mechanisms still require further investigation. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the sympathetic nervous system participates in the effects of serotonin through central serotonin 1A receptors in haemorrhagic shock in rats. In order to determine the role of the sympathetic nervous system alpha-1-, alpha-2-, and beta-adrenergic receptor agonists – prazosin, yohimbine and propranolol, respectively, were used. We found that stimulation of the central serotonin 1A receptors by the administration of a selective agonist – 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin, 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-aminopropane (8-OH-DPAT) into the lateral brain ventricle is connected with the activation of compensation mechanisms leading to the increase in the heart rate and blood pressure. The current results demonstrate that the stimulation of peripheral alpha-1-, alpha-2- and beta-adrenergic receptors plays an essential role in the resuscitative effect triggered by the stimulation of central serotonin 1A receptors.

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