The role of preprocedural monocyte-to-high-density lipoprotein ratio in prediction of atrial fibrillation recurrence after cryoballoon-based catheter ablation

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Abstract

Aims

Previous studies evidenced that increased monocyte count or activity and lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels were associated with more prevalent atrial fibrillation (AF) which attributed to pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant effects. Monocyte-to-HDL ratio (M/H ratio) is a recently emerged indicator of inflammation and oxidative stress which have been only studied in patients with chronic kidney disease. We aimed to investigate the prognostic impact of M/H ratio on AF recurrence after cryoballoon-based catheter ablation.

Methods and results

A total of 402 patients (43.5% female, age 53.5 ± 10.9 years, and 80.8% paroxysmal AF) with symptomatic AF underwent initial cryoablation procedure. Patients were categorized into quartiles on the basis of their pre-procedural M/H ratio. Post-ablation blanking period was observed for 3 months. At a mean follow-up of 20.6 ± 6.0 months, 95 patients (23.6%) had developed AF recurrence. Atrial fibrillation recurrence rates from the lowest to the highest M/H ratio quartiles were 7.4, 7.4, 16.8, and 68.4%, respectively (P < 0.001). On multivariate Cox regression analysis, the preablation M/H ratio (HR: 1.20, 95% CI: 1.15–1.25, P < 0.001), left atrial diameter, duration of AF history, and early AF recurrence were independent predictors of AF recurrence. Using a cut-off level of 11.48, the pre-ablation M/H ratio predicted AF recurrence during follow-up with a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 74%.

Conclusion

Elevated pre-ablation M/H ratio was associated with an increased recurrence of AF after cryoballoon-based catheter ablation. Our results support the role of pre-ablation pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant environment in AF recurrence after ablation therapy but suggest that other factors are also important.

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