Associations between food patterns, socioeconomic position and working situation among adult, working women and men in Oslo


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Abstract

Background/Objectives:Socioeconomic disparities in diet are well documented, but the relative importance of different indicators of socioeconomic position (SEP) is not well known. The aim of this study was to explore relationships between food patterns, SEP (occupation, education and income) and degree of work control.Subjects/Methods:A cross-sectional population-based study 2000–2001, using three self-administered questionnaires including food frequency questions (FFQs). Factor analysis was used to explore food patterns. Participants include 9762 working Oslo citizens, 30–60 years of age, having answered the questionnaires with <20% of the FFQ missing.Results:Four food patterns were found: Western, prudent, traditional and sweet. In multivariate analyses, the likelihood of having a high intake of the Western pattern was lowest in the two highest educational groups (women: odds ratio (OR)= 0.54/OR = 0.75; men: OR = 0.51/OR = 0.76), and in the two highest occupational groups for men (OR = 0.73/OR = 0.78). The odds of having a high intake of the prudent pattern was highest in the two highest educational groups (women: OR = 2.50/OR = 1.84; men: OR = 2.23/OR = 1.37), and among the self-employed (women OR = 1.61, men OR = 1.68), as well as in the highest occupational group for men (OR = 1.33). Women always having work control were least likely to have high intake of the Western pattern (OR = 0.78) and most likely to have high intake of the prudent pattern (OR = 1.39).Conclusions:The SEP indicators were in different ways related to the food patterns, but the effect of occupation and income was partly explained by education, especially among women. Women's work control and men's occupation were important for their eating habits.

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