P752Relation between the heartscore and coronary calcium score


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Abstract

Purpose: The HeartScore scale of the European Society of Cardiology predicts to 10 years the probability of a cardiovascular event. The coronary arterial calcium is a distinctive factor of established arterioesclerotic disease and an independent prognostic factor of cardiovascular events. However, when undergoing an excessive rise it prevents a correct assessment of the examination. Our purpose is to look for a relation between the two predicting scales.Methods and resources: Noninvasive angiography was carried out and Calcium Score (CS) was measured in Agatston units to 293 symptomatic patients between January/2006 and March/2011. Population was subdivided in three groups: under risk (HeartScore<5%), intermediate risk (5-10%) and high risk (≥10%). The indications, preparation and accomplishment of the test followed the Guide of Clinical Practice in force.Results: 58±2 years, 49.5% men, diabetics 18.1%, HeartScore 1,82% [IC95% (1,66-1,98)], CS median of 0 and interquartile range of 120 (asymmetric distribution). HeartScore <5% in 173 patients (59.0%), 5-10% in 64 patients (21.9%), and ≥10% in 36 patients (12.3%). By groups they presented respectively a CS of 74,39; 367,20; and 1036,72 in Agatston units. The difference between the groups' average CS was statistically significant (p<0,05). Significant differences concerning CS fitted by diabetes were not found. A bivariate correlation between the value of HeartScore and CS Pearson=0,440 (p<0,01) was applied. The dispersion and asymmetry of the sample prevented to suitably adjust a regression model.Conclusions: In our sample the values of the HeartScore and the CS are related in a statistically significant form, values of CS increase as risk rises according to HeartScore. The correct selection of patients (low-intermediate HeartScore), predicts lower CS, and therefore less devices of calcium in the assessment of the test.

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