Clinical characteristics, management, and outcomes of acute heart failure patients: observations from the Gulf acute heart failure registry (Gulf CARE)


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Abstract

AimsThe purpose of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics, management, and outcomes of acute heart failure (HF) patients from the Gulf acute heart failure registry (Gulf CARE).Methods and resultsData from 5005 HF patients admitted to 47 hospitals in seven Gulf countries during February to November 2012 were analysed. Fifty-five per cent of patients presented with acute decompensated chronic HF, while 45% had new-onset HF. Mean age was 59 ± 15 years, 63% were males, and 83% were Gulf citizens. Co-morbid conditions were hypertension (61%), diabetes mellitus (50%), CAD (47%), and atrial fibrillation or flutter (14%). The median LVEF was 35% (25–45%) with 69% presenting as HF with reduced EF (HFrEF). CAD was the most prevalent aetiology (53%) followed by idiopathic cardiomyopathy (18%), hypertensive heart disease (16%), and valvular heart disease (9%). At discharge, 71% and 78% of patients received beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors/ARBs, respectively. Use of coronary intervention and device therapy was <10%. In-hospital mortality was 6.3%. Re-hospitalization and cumulative mortality at 3 and 12 months were 18%/13% and 40%/20%, respectively.ConclusionsGulf CARE results show that patients from this region are a decade younger than their Western counterparts, with a high prevalence of diabetes and HFrEF, and a lower prevalence of AF. Use of coronary intervention and device therapy was low, with high re-hospitalization rates. Short- and long-term mortality rates were similar to those of Western registries, but should be interpreted in the light of the younger age of Gulf CARE patients.

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