Effect of creatine supplementation and drop-set resistance training in untrained aging adults

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Abstract

Objective:

To investigate the effects of creatine supplementation and drop-set resistance training in untrained aging adults. Participants were randomized to one of two groups: Creatine (CR: n = 14, 7 females, 7 males; 58.0 ± 3.0 yrs, 0.1 g/kg/day of creatine + 0.1 g/kg/day of maltodextrin) or Placebo (PLA: n = 17, 7 females, 10 males; age: 57.6 ± 5.0 yrs, 0.2 g/kg/day of maltodextrin) during 12 weeks of drop-set resistance training (3 days/week; 2 sets of leg press, chest press, hack squat and lat pull-down exercises performed to muscle fatigue at 80% baseline 1-repetition maximum [1-RM] immediately followed by repetitions to muscle fatigue at 30% baseline 1-RM).

Methods:

Prior to and following training and supplementation, assessments were made for body composition, muscle strength, muscle endurance, tasks of functionality, muscle protein catabolism and diet.

Results:

Drop-set resistance training improved muscle mass, muscle strength, muscle endurance and tasks of functionality (p < 0.05). The addition of creatine to drop-set resistance training significantly increased body mass (p = 0.002) and muscle mass (p = 0.007) compared to placebo. Males on creatine increased muscle strength (lat pull-down only) to a greater extent than females on creatine (p = 0.005). Creatine enabled males to resistance train at a greater capacity over time compared to males on placebo (p = 0.049) and females on creatine (p = 0.012). Males on creatine (p = 0.019) and females on placebo (p = 0.014) decreased 3-MH compared to females on creatine.

Conclusions:

The addition of creatine to drop-set resistance training augments the gains in muscle mass from resistance training alone. Creatine is more effective in untrained aging males compared to untrained aging females.

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