Pathogenesis in tuberculosis: transcriptomic approaches to unraveling virulence mechanisms and finding new drug targets

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major health problem worldwide. Attempts to control this disease have proved difficult owing to our poor understanding of the pathobiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the emergence of strains that are resistant to multiple drugs currently available for treatment. Genome-wide expression profiling has provided new insight into the transcriptome signatures of the bacterium during infection, notably of macrophages and dendritic cells. These data indicate that M. tuberculosis expresses numerous genes to evade the host immune responses, to suit its intracellular life style, and to respond to various antibiotic drugs. Among the intracellularly induced genes, several have functions in lipid metabolism, cell wall synthesis, iron uptake, oxidative stress resistance, protein secretion, or inhibition of apoptosis. Herein we review these findings and discuss possible ways to exploit the data to understand the complex etiology of TB and to find new effective drug targets.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles