Serum immune response of pearl oysterPinctada fucatato xenografts and allografts

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Abstract

The mantle piece from the donor pearl oyster would be rejected by the immune system of recipient oyster in pearl culture practice, especially in the case that the donor and receptor are different species. Thus, investigation of the immune response of recipient oyster to grafted mantle pieces, particularly to xenografts, is of importance in creating xenograft transplantation technology for pearl culture industry. The humoral immune responses of P. fucata to allograft (mantle piece of P. fucata) and xenografts (mantle pieces of P. maxima and P. margaritifera, respectively) were studied in this paper. The oysters receiving no transplantations were served as the control group. The serum was collected from recipient P. fucata at 1 d, 2 d, 3 d, 4 d, 5 d, 7 d, 9 d, 11 d, 13 d, and 15 d, respectively after transplantation, and the serum antibacterial activity, lysozyme activity (LZM), alkaline phosphatase (AKP), acid phosphatase (ACP), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and agglutination to rabbit red blood cells were investigated. The result indicated that serum of both the experimental groups and the control group can agglutinate rabbit red blood cells, with variation between groups and between time points, respectively. The antibacterial activity in the experimental group was significantly higher than that in the control group at 2–4 d, but lower at 5–11 d and returned back to normal at 15 d, with significant differences among experimental groups (P < 0.05). The LZM in the experimental group was significantly higher than that in the control group at 3–7 d, with significant differences in bacteriolytic activity among various groups (P < 0.05). Both the ACP and AKP activity levels in the experimental groups were higher than those in the control group at 2–9 d, with significant differences among various groups at 3–9 d (P < 0.05). The TAC level in the experimental groups was higher than that in the control group at 1–7 d, with significant differences among various groups at 4–7 d (P < 0.05). The above results indicated that all of the humoral immune factors investigated showed immune responses to both allografts and xenografts, with no specific to any of them. Thus, it is necessary to further screen immune rejection factors specific to xenografts, including cellular immune components.

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