Physical activity in older adults in a combined functional circuit and walking program

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Abstract

Our study examined the impact of a 16-week functional circuit/walking program on physical activity (PA) in older adults in independent-living facilities. Exploratory goals included examination of associations among self-efficacy, neighborhood and mobility. Participants (N = 13) were female (M = 77.8, SD = 7.44, range = 65–85 years). One third were African-American; the remainder Caucasian; 1/3 used assistive devices. PA increased from 70 min/week (SD = 35.51) at baseline to 81.31 min/week (SD = 34.21) at 16 weeks. PA was associated with self-efficacy for overcoming neighborhood and facility barriers to walking at all measurement points (baseline r = .73, p < .05 and r = .68, p < .05, respectively). At eight weeks, PA was associated with self-efficacy for walking duration (r = .58, p < .05), self-efficacy for individual (r = .66, p < .05), facility (r = .58, p < .05) and neighborhood (r = .70, p < .05) barriers. At sixteen weeks, physical activity was associated with balance confidence (r = .72, p < .05), and self-efficacy for individual (r = .76, p < .05), facility (r = .71, p < .05), and neighborhood (r = .80, p < .01) barriers. Functional circuit/walking interventions can increase PA in older adults. Further examination of self-efficacy, mobility, neighborhoods and PA is needed.

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