Individual- and School-Level Factors Related to School-Based Salad Bar Use Among Children and Adolescents

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Abstract

Background. Consumption levels of fruits and vegetables (F/V) among children/adolescents are low. Programs like school-based salad bars (SB) provide children/adolescents increased F/V access. Aims. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between SB use and individual and school-level factors among elementary and secondary school students in New Orleans public schools. Method. Twelve schools receiving SB units from the Let’s Move Salad Bars to Schools Campaign participated in this study. Self-reported data were collected from students (n = 1,012), administrators (n = 12), and food service staff (n = 37). School environmental data were obtained through direct observation. Generalized estimating equation regression methods were used to develop a multilevel model including both school-level (e.g., length of lunchtime, SB marketing, vending machines) and individual-level (e.g., sex, food preferences, nutrition knowledge) effects. Results. Female students had higher odds of using the SB compared to males. Students with healthier food preferences had higher odds of using the SB than those who reported less healthy food preferences. Within the multilevel model for all students, only sex and healthy food preferences remained significant. In a multilevel model assessing secondary students only, student encouragement toward others for healthy eating and school-based SB marketing were significantly related to SB use. Conclusions. Little research has examined factors related to school-based SB use. These findings suggest recommendations that may help improve student use of SBs. For example, increasing the promotion of SB, particularly in secondary schools, might encourage their use among students.

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