Preclinical Development of a Bridging Therapy for Radiation Casualties: Appropriate for High Risk Personnel

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Abstract

The authors demonstrate the efficacy of a bridging therapy in a preclinical animal model that allows the lymphohematopoietic system of severely immunocompromised individuals exposed to acute, high-dose ionizing irradiation to recover and to survive. CD2F1 mice were irradiated acutely with high doses causing severe, potentially fatal hematopoietic or gastrointestinal injuries and then transfused intravenously with progenitor-enriched, whole blood, or peripheral blood mononuclear cells from mice injected with tocopherol succinate- and AMD3100‐ (a chemokine receptor anatogonist used to improve the yield of mobilized progenitors). Survival of these mice over a 30‐d period was used as the primary measured endpoint of therapeutic effectiveness. The authors demonstrate that tocopherol succinate and AMD3100 mobilize progenitors into peripheral circulation and that the infusion of mobilized progenitor enriched blood or mononuclear cells acts as a bridging therapy for lymphohematopoietic system recovery in mice exposed to whole-body ionizing irradiation. The results demonstrate that infusion of whole blood or blood mononuclear cells from tocopherol succinate (TS)- and AMD3100‐injected mice improved the survival of mice receiving high radiation doses significantly. The efficacy of TS-injected donor mice blood or mononuclear cells was comparable to that of blood or cells obtained from mice injected with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Donor origin-mobilized progenitors were found to localize in various tissues. The authors suggest that tocopherol succinate is an optimal agent for mobilizing progenitors with significant therapeutic potential. The extent of progenitor mobilization that tocopherol succinate elicits in experimental mice is comparable quantitatively to clinically used drugs such as granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and AMD3100. Therefore, it is proposed that tocopherol succinate be considered for further translational development and ultimately for use in humans.

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