Return to sports activity with short stems or standard stems in total hip arthroplasty in patients less than 50 years old

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Background:

The aim of this study was to compare return to sport activity between a short femoral cementless stem and a conventional femoral cementless stem in total hip arthroplasty in patients 50 years old and younger.

Methods:

We retrospectively reviewed 55 patients (61 hips) treated with a short femoral cementless stem and 28 patients (32 hips) treated with a conventional femoral cementless stem 50 years old and younger from December 2009 and December 2014.Their mean age was 39.86 (22-49) years and 38.68 (18-49) years, respectively. The mean follow-up was 54.1 (15-68) months and 52.7 (15-72) months, respectively. They were pre- and postoperatively evaluated by the clinical and radiological examination.

Results:

No patients with the short stem had intraoperative fracture, but 1 patient with the conventional stem had intraoperative fracture. At final follow-up, there was no statistically significant difference in Harris Hip Score, and radiographic review level between 2 stems. No hip with the short stem had thigh pain, but 6 hips with the conventional stem had thigh pain at the final follow-up. No component was revised for aseptic loosening in either group. There were no differences observed in the return to sports activity between the 2 groups.

Conclusions:

Our study demonstrated that both short cementless stem and conventional cementless stem provided stable fixation and achieved a satisfactory result in patients 50 years old and younger. There is no difference in return to sports activity level after the procedure.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles