The 5-phosphatase OCRL mediates retrograde transport of the mannose 6-phosphate receptor by regulating a Rac1-cofilin signalling module


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Abstract

Mutations in the OCRL gene encoding the phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) 5-phosphatase OCRL cause Lowe syndrome (LS), which is characterized by intellectual disability, cataracts and selective proximal tubulopathy. OCRL localizes membrane-bound compartments and is implicated in intracellular transport. Comprehensive analysis of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in fibroblasts of patients with LS did not reveal any difference in trafficking of epidermal growth factor, low density lipoprotein or transferrin, compared with normal fibroblasts. However, LS fibroblasts displayed reduced mannose 6-phosphate receptor (MPR)-mediated re-uptake of the lysosomal enzyme arylsulfatase B. In addition, endosome-to-trans Golgi network (TGN) transport of MPRs was decreased significantly, leading to higher levels of cell surface MPRs and their enrichment in enlarged, retromer-positive endosomes in OCRL-depleted HeLa cells. In line with the higher steady-state concentration of MPRs in the endosomal compartment in equilibrium with the cell surface, anterograde transport of the lysosomal enzyme, cathepsin D was impaired. Wild-type OCRL counteracted accumulation of MPR in endosomes in an activity-dependent manner, suggesting that PI(4,5)P2 modulates the activity state of proteins regulated by this phosphoinositide. Indeed, we detected an increased amount of the inactive, phosphorylated form of cofilin and lower levels of the active form of PAK3 upon OCRL depletion. Levels of active Rac1 and RhoA were reduced or enhanced, respectively. Overexpression of Rac1 rescued both enhanced levels of phosphorylated cofilin and MPR accumulation in enlarged endosomes. Our data suggest that PI(4,5)P2 dephosphorylation through OCRL regulates a Rac1-cofilin signalling cascade implicated in MPR trafficking from endosomes to the TGN.

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