IVF outcomes in obese donor oocyte recipients: a systematic review and meta-analysis

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Abstract

STUDY QUESTION

Does obesity influence the chance of pregnancy after IVF in donor oocyte recipients?

SUMMARY ANSWER

The chance of pregnancy after IVF is no different in obese donor oocyte recipients versus those in the normal BMI range.

WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY

Obesity is associated with decreased chances of pregnancy in women undergoing IVF with autologous oocytes. Prior studies have investigated the impact of obesity on IVF outcomes in donor oocyte recipients, with disparate results. This is the first systematic review and meta-analysis to address this topic.

STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION

A systematic review and meta-analysis of published literature identified in Medline, EMBASE and Scopus through December of 2011 were performed to address the association between BMI and outcomes for donor oocyte recipients. The primary outcome of this study was implantation.

PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS

Two authors conducted the searches independently, selected the studies and abstracted the data. Studies in English of first donor oocyte cycles with reported recipient BMI were included. Primary data collected from the IVF program at Washington University were also included as one study (n = 123 donor oocyte recipients). Studies limited to frozen embryo transfer were excluded. Data were synthesized using DerSimonian–Laird random effects models for implantation, clinical pregnancy, miscarriage and live birth.

MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE

Of 475 screened articles, 7 were reviewed and 5 were included together with primary data from Washington University, giving a total of 4758 women who were included for the assessment of the primary outcome. No associations between obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) and chance of pregnancy after IVF were noted in women using donor oocytes [risk ratio (RR): 0.98, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.83–1.15, I2: 61.6%]. Additional analyses assessing associations between recipient obesity and embryo implantation (RR: 0.93, 95% CI: 0.80–1.07, I2: 0%), miscarriage (RR: 1.12, 95% CI: 0.83–1.50, I2: 0%) and live birth (RR: 0.91, 95% CI: 0.65–1.27, I2 47.9%) also failed to show a negative effect.

LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION

Included studies were small and they were performed in a variety of locations and practice settings where stimulation and laboratory protocols may differ, and extremes of BMI may also differ. Furthermore, included studies had different inclusion and exclusion criteria. These factors could not be controlled for in this meta-analysis and statistical heterogeneity was noted for some outcomes.

WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS

These data suggest obesity does not affect IVF outcomes in women using donor oocytes. Oocyte quality rather than endometrial receptivity may be the overriding factor influencing IVF outcomes in obese women using autologous oocytes.

STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S)

E.S.J. and M.G.T receive support from the Women's Reproductive Health Research Program sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (K12 HD063086). The authors do not have any competing interests.

TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER

N/A.

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