ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channels in the Basilar Artery During Chronic Hypertension

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

We examined the hypothesis that dilatation of the basilar artery in response to activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channels is impaired in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). Changes in basilar artery diameter in response to aprikalim, a direct activator of ATP-sensitive potassium channels, were measured in anesthetized SHRSP and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats through a cranial window. Topical application of aprikalim increased basilar artery diameter in WKY rats. Glibenclamide, a selective inhibitor of ATP-sensitive potassium channels, abolished aprikalim-induced vasodilatation. Thus, ATP-sensitive potassium channels are functional in the basilar artery of WKY rats in vivo. Aprikalim (10−6 mol/L) dilated the basilar artery by 31±5% (mean ± SEM) in WKY rats but only 5±1% in SHRSP. The concentration-response curve to aprikalim in SHRSP was significantly shifted to the right, but the response to the highest concentration of aprikalim (10−55 mol/L) was similar in SHRSP and WKY rats. Vasodilatation in response to norepinephrine was also impaired in SHRSP. Dilator responses of the basilar artery to forskolin, a direct activator of adenylate cyclase, and nitroprusside, a direct activator of guanylate cyclase, were normal in SHRSP. The findings suggest that dilatation of the basilar artery in response to direct activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channels is impaired in SHRSP compared with WKY rats in vivo.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles