Comparison of betaxolol with verapamil in hypertensive patients: discrepancy between office and ambulatory blood pressures


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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare in the individual hypertensive patient the blood pressure lowering effect of β-blocking agent i.e. betaxolol with that of a calcium entry blocker, i.e. verapamil. The antihypertensive efficacy of the drugs was evaluated both at the physician's office and by monitoring ambulatory daytime blood pressure using a portable blood pressure recorder (Remler M2000). Seventeen patients with uncomplicated essential hypertension (aged 35-67 years) were treated for two consecutive 6-week periods with either betaxolol, 20 mg/day or a slow-release formulation of verapamil, 240-480mg/day. The sequence of treatment phases was randomly allocated and a 2-week wash-out period preceded each treatment. Both betaxolol and verapamil had a significant blood pressure lowering effect when assessed at the physician's office. However, ambulatory recorded blood pressures were significantly reduced only with betaxolol. In the presence of a physician, the best responders to betaxolol tended to be also the best responders to verapamil, whereas there was no relationship between the fall in ambulatory recorded blood pressure observed during betaxolol and the corresponding fall during verapamil administration. The blood pressure response to both betaxolol and verapamil was not related to age

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