Alcohol intake and cardiovascular mortality in hypertensive patients: report from the Department of Health Hypertension Care Computing Project


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Abstract

Objective:To determine the benefits and risks of drinking alcohol in treated hypertensives.Design:A prospective study of 6369 hypertensives (3161 men) attending primarily hospital clinics in the UK.Methods:Relative risks both for drinkers compared with non-drinkers and for level of alcohol consumption were calculated for mortality from ischaemic heart disease, stroke, non-circulatory and all causes.Results:At presentation 76% of the men and 48% of the women reported recent alcohol consumption. Compared with drinkers, non-drinkers were older, less likely to smoke and had a higher untreated blood pressure. After adjustment for confounding factors, male drinkers had a reduced risk of stroke mortality and possibly of ischaemic heart disease mortality. Similar results were observed in women for stroke mortality but not for ischaemic heart disease mortality. The trend remained after adjustment for previous cardiovascular disease. In men the lowest risk of ischaemic heart disease mortality occurred at intakes of>21 units per week and stroke mortality was lowest at 1-10 units per week. Men consuming >21 units per week had a twofold higher non-circulatory mortality. Total mortality was lowest in men who drank 1-10 units per week. Similar effects of alcohol on cardiovascular mortality were observed in women.Conclusions:Alcohol intake may reduce stroke mortality in treated hypertensives. Ischaemic heart disease mortality in men may also be reduced, especially at higher intakes (>21 units per week). The beneficial effects were offset by increasing incidence of non-circulatory causes of death. Alcohol consumption of 1-10 units per week was associated with the lowest mortality in men

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