P-110 Venous Thromboembolism in IBD. Four-Year Retrospective Analysis at LSUHSC-Shreveport

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Abstract

Background:

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is an infrequent but serious comorbidity often associated with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). This was a 4-years retrospective analysis of venous thromboembolism in IBD at LSUHSC-S which evaluated gender and racial contributions to VTE based on ICD9 coding in 276 IBD patients (white/black/other). Of 213 total Crohn's disease (CD) patients, 6.1% (13 patients) had a recorded an episode of VTE (by imaging or in medical history). Of these 13 CD patients, 9 had active disease and 4 non-active disease. One hundred eleven CD patients were white (52%), 42% were African American (AA), 6% were other groups. Of these CD patients, 42% were males, 58% female. Of the 13 patients that had a VTE record, 9 (69%) were female 31% male. In CD, we found that AA males had significantly fewer years since diagnosis than white males) (9 ± 1.28 versus 13.54 ± 1.21, P < 0.05). At the same time 63 patients (all races) were seen with UC, (3.38-fold fewer cases than CD). Twenty-five of these patients were white (39.6%), 39.6% were AA and 20.6% were other racial/ethnic categories. Two of these patients had a record of VTE (3.17%). Both of these patients had active disease and were male and female (1:1). In UC, although not statistically significant, white males and females showed more long-standing disease than AA males and females (WM—12.3 y, WF—12.4 versus BM 8.1, 9.7 y.) When non-white/AA patients were excluded, only 1 patient of 50 (2%) UC showed VTE while 12/200 patients (6%) had VTE in CD. Although there is an association of VTE with IBD, at our institution there appears to be more VTE records found in CD than in UC. Although more VTE is seen here more frequently in CD than in UC, the clinical significance of this finding remains unclear and could reflect factors other than diagnosis including therapeutic regimen, other coagulopathies and co-morbidities not identified in this study.

Methods:

As above.

Results:

As above.

Conclusions:

Although there is an association of VTE with IBD, at our institution there appears to be more VTE records found in CD than in UC. Although more VTE is seen here more frequently in CD than in UC, the clinical significance of this finding remains unclear and could reflect factors other than diagnosis including therapeutic regimen, other coagulopathies and co-morbidities not identified in this study.

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