The association between bone mineral density and higher body mass index in men

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Background:

A number of studies have identified that higher body mass index is associated with higher bone mineral density. However, a small number of previous studies have indicated an association between higher body mass index (> 35 kg/m2) and lower bone mineral density. No previous study has investigated the association between higher body mass index and bone mineral density in a large male population.

Methods:

Data of men aged over 50 years of age who attended for a dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scan at a UK teaching hospital were collated. The population was divided according to body mass index increments of 5 kg/m2. The mean bone mineral density of both the lumbar spine and femoral neck was ascertained for each body mass index category. Multiple linear regression analysis, adjusted for age, was used to investigate for an association between body mass index and bone mineral density.

Results:

Data of 1263 men were collated. Increasing body mass index was associated with increasing bone mineral density of both the lumbar spine and femoral neck up to 35 kg/m2; further increase in body mass index was not associated with an increasing bone mineral density.

Conclusions:

The beneficial effect upon bone mineral density of increasing body mass index exists up to 35 kg/m2; a body mass index higher than 35 kg/m2 is not associated with further increase in bone mineral density.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles