The Influence of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy on Quality of Life of Gynecologic Cancer Survivors

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Abstract

Objective

The aim of this observational study was to investigate correlations between long-term chemotherapy-induced peripheral neurotoxicity (CIPN) and quality of life (physical well-being, social well-being, emotional well-being, and functional well-being [FWB]) among survivors of gynecologic cancer (GC).

Methods

We aimed to assess the correlation of quality of life and long-term CIPN with the temporal change in recurrence-free GC survival. Questionnaire responses and clinical data of 259 GC survivors were collected and assessed according to treatment received. The χ2 test was used to determine the significance of correlations.

Results

Of 165 evaluable patients treated by chemotherapy, 36 patients (21.8%) developed CIPN of Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events grade 1 or higher during the study. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neurotoxicity had significantly improved over time in the domain of FWB at 61 months or more after the end of chemotherapy (posttreatment 4) among GC survivors (P = 0.003). Furthermore, CIPN treated by more than 6 courses of the paclitaxel and carboplatin regimen among GC survivors showed significant improvement over time in the emotional well-being domain at 25 to 60 months and 61 months or more after the end of chemotherapy (posttreatments 3 and 4) (P = 0.037 and P = 0.023) and in FWB at posttreatment 4 (P < 0.001).

Conclusions

Emotional and functional domains of CIPN improved over time among GC survivors treated by more than 6 courses of the paclitaxel and carboplatin regimen. Based on these results, further research is required to identify additional preventative or curative approaches.

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