A study on the survival of primary molars with intact and with defective restorations

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Background.

Failed restorations in primary teeth are not always re-restored. Is re-restoration not required anymore?

Objective.

To compare survival rates of primary molars with intact and defective amalgam and ART restorations.

Methods.

A total of 649 restored primary molars, of which 162 were assessed with defective restorations for mechanical reasons, from a cluster-randomised controlled clinical trial, were followed up over a period of 3.5 years. Restored primary molars, extracted because of dental sepsis or toothache, were considered a failure. Primary molars with defective restorations were followed up from the time they were assessed defective. Data were analysed using PHREG model with frailty correction, Wald test, t-test, and jackknife procedure.

Results.

The survival rate of primary molars with intact restorations (96.3%) was statistically significantly higher than that of primary molars with defective restorations (75.9%) over a 3-year period (P < 0.0001). Neither the effect of treatment protocol (amalgam or ART) (P = 0.05) nor the type of surface (single or multiple) (P = 0.73) was observed with respect to the survival rate of restored primary molars.

Conclusions.

Survival rates for primary molars with intact and defective amalgam and ART restorations were high. The 3-year survival rate of primary molars with intact restorations was significantly higher than that of primary molars with defective restorations.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles