Effect of Clinical Factors on Bacterial Contamination of Bone Chips Collected During Implant Surgery

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Abstract

Purpose:

The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between various clinical factors and bacterial contamination of bone chips (BC) collected during dental implant surgery and to elucidate how bacterial contamination might be minimized.

Materials and Methods:

Implants were installed in 55 partially edentulous patients (36 men and 19 women), among whom the relationship between various clinical factors and bacterial contamination of BC collected by bone trap was investigated in 37. The effect of rinsing with a saline on BC was determined in 18 patients. Number of contaminating microorganisms was expressed as colony-forming units (CFUs).

Results:

CFUs in the maxilla were lower than those in the mandible (P < 0.01). CFUs at the incisors or canines were lower than those at the premolars or molars (P < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis revealed a relationship between average bacterial count and duration of surgery (odds ratio, 1.046; 95% CI, 1.012–1.081). Rinsing of BC reduced bacterial contamination.

Conclusion:

Duration of surgery is a major clinical factor affecting contamination risk in BC, and rinsing of BC with a sterile saline solution reduces bacterial number.

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