Induction of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte and antibody responses against highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection in mice by inoculation of apathogenic H5N1 influenza virus particles inactivated with formalin

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Summary

We investigated whether a vaccine derived from an apathogenic reassortant type A H5N1 influenza strain could induce immune responses in vivo that mediated protection from highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection in mice. After two subcutaneous immunizations with formalin-inactivated H5N1 whole virus particles (whole particle vaccine), significant killing specific for cells presenting a nucleoprotein peptide from the vaccine strain of the virus was observed. Similar vaccination with viruses treated with ether and formalin, which are commonly used for humans as ether-split vaccines, induced little or no cytotoxic T-cell response. Furthermore, whole particle vaccines of the apathogenic H5N1 strain were more effective than ether-split vaccines at inducing antibody production able to neutralize a highly pathogenic H5N1 strain. Finally, whole particle vaccines of H5N1 protected mice against infection by an H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus more effectively than did ether-split vaccines. These results suggest that formalin-inactivated virus particles of apathogenic strains are effective for induction of both cytotoxic T-lymphocyte and antibody responses against highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in vivo, resulting in protection from infection by a highly pathogenic H5N1 virus.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles