Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein in critically ill neonates and children with suspected infection: comparison with procalcitonin, interleukin-6, and C-reactive protein

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Abstract

Objective:

To evaluate markers of infection in critically ill neonates and children, comparing lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) with procalcitonin (PCT), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and C-reactive protein (CRP).

Design and setting:

Prospective, observational study in the level III multidisciplinary neonatal and pediatric intensive care unit.

Patients:

Sixty patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and suspected infection classified into two groups: SIRS/sepsis (n=33) and SIRS/no sepsis (n=27). We included 29 neonates aged less than 48 h (neonates <48 h), 12 neonates older than 48 h (neonates >48 h), and 19 children. Median disease severity was high in neonates aged under 48 h and moderate in neonates aged over 48 h and children.

Interventions:

Serum LBP, PCT, IL-6, and CRP were measured on two consecutive days. Area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC), sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values were evaluated.

Results:

Serum LBP was higher in patients with SIRS/sepsis than in patients with SIRS/no sepsis. AUC for LBP on the first day of suspected infection was 0.89 in the younger neonates, 0.93 in the older neonates, and 0.91 in children.

Conclusions:

In critically ill neonates aged under 48 h LBP on the first day of suspected infection is a better marker of sepsis than IL-6 and PCT, and is similar to CRP. In critically ill neonates aged over 48 h and children LBP is a better marker than IL-6 and CRP, and is similar to PCT.

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