Work and non-work social support and intent to stay at work among Jordanian hospital nurses


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Abstract

Purpose:To examine (1) the level of intent to stay at work among Jordanian nurses; (2) the levels of at-work and non-work social support; and (3) the extent of variance in the level of intent to stay at work because of the demographic and social support variables.Design:A survey design was used to investigate the predictors of intent to stay at work among the population of Jordanian nurses in three public hospitals. Two hundred and seventy five participants submitted complete and usable questionnaires. The response rates were 50%, 55% and 70%, respectively.Methods:Data were collected using a questionnaire that included a scale for measuring social support, the McCain's Intent to Stay Scale and the demographic form.Findings:The results showed that support from supervisors, marital status, number of friends at work, number of children at home, gender, time commitment, support from co-workers and support from family accounted for 60% of the variation in the level of intent to stay. The results indicated that nurses who were females, had children at home, worked full time and perceived having more support from co-workers and supervisors tended to stay at work more than others. On the other hand, the results showed that marital status, number of friends at work and family support were associated negatively with intent to stay at work.Conclusion:The findings of the study suggest the important role of workplace social support in enhancing the level of intent to stay at work.

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