The clinical utility of HIV outpatient pharmacist prescreening to reduce medication error and assess adherence


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Abstract

Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is complex and has high propensity for medication error and drug-drug interactions (DDIs). We evaluated the clinical utility of pharmacist prescreening for DDIs, adherence to ART and medicines reconciliation prior to HIV outpatient appointments. A pharmacist took detailed medication histories and ART adherence assessments, then screened medication for DDIs. A template detailing current medication, potential DDIs and adherence was filed in the clinical notes and physicians were asked for structured feedback. Potential DDIs were observed in 58% of 200 patients, with 22 (9%) potential DDIs occurring with medication that was not previously recorded in the patients’ notes. Of 103 physician responses, 61.2% reported that the pharmacist consultation told them something they did not know, and pharmacist consultants led to change in management in 13.6% of cases. Pharmacist consultations were more likely to add benefit in patients taking two or more concomitant medications in addition to ART (P = 0.0012).

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