Switched memory B cells promote alveolar bone damage during periodontitis: An adoptive transfer experiment


    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Periodontitis is a bacteria-induced disease that often leads to alveolar bone damage. We sought to determine the role and mechanism of switched memory B cells in alveolar bone destruction during periodontitis. Sensitized B cells were sorted and cultured, then their expression of receptor activator for nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-12 (IL-12) was detected. Using these cells, we prepared adoptive transfer models in which we induced periodontitis. We found that switched memory B cells produced more RANKL in terms of both protein and mRNA levels than other subpopulations. Switched memory B cells expressed more IL-6 and IL-12 mRNA than other subpopulations, but differences in respective protein levels were not significant. Moreover, we found that switched memory B cell transfer resulted in increased alveolar bone loss and periodontal osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, switched memory B cell transfer increased the proportion of Th1 and Th17 cells as well as the expression of RANKL, osteoprotegerin (OPG), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17A in gingiva, and cervical lymph nodes (CLNs). The outcomes of the present study indicate that switched memory B cells regulate alveolar bone homeostasis via enhancing cytokine expression and increasing proliferation of Th1 and Th17 cells.HighlightsSwitched memory B cells promote alveolar bone destruction and periodontal osteoclastogenesis during periodontitis.Switched memory B cells enhanced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in local lesions during periodontitis.Switched memory B cells elevated proportion Th1 and Th17 cells in local lesions during periodontitis.Other B cells subpopulations have limited to do with alveolar bone homeostasis during periodontitis.

    loading  Loading Related Articles