Secukinumab long-term safety experience: A pooled analysis of 10 phase II and III clinical studies in patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis

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Abstract

Background:

Secukinumab, a fully human anti–interleukin-17A monoclonal antibody, has demonstrated efficacy and safety in patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis.

Objective:

We reviewed safety data from the secukinumab psoriasis phase II/III program.

Methods:

Data were pooled from 10 phase II/III secukinumab psoriasis studies.

Results:

Analysis included 3993 subjects; 3430 received secukinumab, representing 2725 subject-years (SYs) of exposure. Over 52 weeks, for secukinumab 300 mg, 150 mg, and etanercept, respectively, exposure-adjusted incidence rates (IRs) per 100 SYs were comparable across treatments for total adverse events (AEs; 236.1, 239.9, and 243.4, respectively); infections (91.1, 85.3, and 93.7, respectively); serious AEs (7.4, 6.8, and 7.0, respectively); serious infections (1.4, 1.1, and 1.4, respectively); malignant or unspecified tumors (0.77, 0.97, and 0.68, respectively); and adjudicated major adverse cardiovascular events (0.42, 0.35, and 0.34, respectively). AEs were not dose-related except for nonserious, mild/moderate, skin/mucosal candidiasis (IRs 3.55, 1.85, and 1.37 for secukinumab 300 mg, 150 mg, and etanercept, respectively).

Limitations:

There was a limited number of patients in comparator groups and the exposure to placebo was short.

Conclusion:

Secukinumab had a favorable safety profile, had no meaningful difference between the 300- and 150-mg doses and, in terms of safety, was comparable to etanercept over 52 weeks in patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis.

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