T-cell–mediated immune response to pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-13) and tetanus toxoid vaccine in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis during tofacitinib treatment

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Abstract

Background:

Psoriasis is often treated with immunomodulatory therapies that can affect the immune response to common antigens. Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor.

Objective:

To characterize the effect of long-term exposure to tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily on T-cell function in psoriasis patients.

Methods:

Patients completing at least 3 months' continuous treatment with tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily were vaccinated with T-cell–dependent vaccines (monovalent tetanus toxoid and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate [PCV-13]). Patients were assessed at baseline (before vaccination) and then again 4 weeks after vaccination. For PCV-13, we evaluated serotype-specific, opsonophagocytic antibody responses, and for tetanus toxoid, we evaluated humoral responses.

Results:

Among 60 patients who completed the study, the geometric mean fold rise from baseline for the 13 PCV serotypes at 4 weeks postvaccination varied from 8.3 (serotype 3) to 101.9 (serotype 6A). Similar results were observed for patients with and without lymphopenia at baseline. For tetanus toxoid, 51 (88%) patients had ≥2-fold and 35 (60%) patients had ≥4-fold rise in antibody concentration.

Limitations:

There was no placebo control.

Conclusion:

Most psoriasis patients who receive tofacitinib can mount satisfactory T-cell–dependent responses to PCV-13 and tetanus vaccines.

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