CHANGES IN NUMBER AND TYPE OF ERRORS ON REPETITION OF ACOUSTICALLY DISTORTED SENTENCES AS A FUNCTION OF AGE IN NORMAL CHILDREN

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

ABSTRACT

The intelligibility of recorded sentences, distorted by binaural switching, interruption, and low-pass filtering, was investigated in 53 children ranging in age from five to eleven and in adults. All had normal hearing. The sentence vocabulary was pretested for comprehension, articulation errors were evaluated in a way so as not to influence test results, and length and structure of the sentences were controlled. The results indicated that although the performance of children increased with age, the 11-year-old group had not attained adult performance. Error analyses showed that most errors for all age groups were acoustically unrelated to the distorted message, although adults made more acoustically related errors than did children. When children made errors in sentences, other errors (e.g., substitutions) were made to preserve the syntax or semantic integrity of the message.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles