Incidence of Lipoatrophy and Lipohypertrophy in the Women's Interagency HIV Study

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Objective

To estimate the incidence of lipoatrophy and lipohypertrophy among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women from the Women's Interagency HIV Study.

Design

Eight hundred fifteen women with semiannual data on self-report of bidirectional change in body fat, anthropometric measurements, weight, and bioelectric impedance analysis were included in a 30-month incidence analysis.

Methods

Lipoatrophy and lipohypertrophy in both peripheral (arms, legs, and buttocks) and central (waist, chest, and upper back) sites were defined by self-report of either a decrease or an increase in a body fat region over the previous 6 months that was confirmed by a corresponding change in anthropometric measurement.

Results

Weight and total body fat increased in HIV-uninfected women but remained stable in HIV-infected women over 30 months. Among HIV-infected women, the incidence of peripheral (relative hazard, 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4–3.3) and central (relative hazard, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.2–2.8) lipoatrophy was about double that among HIV-uninfected women, after adjustment for age and race. The incidence of peripheral lipohypertrophy appeared lower among HIV-infected women than among HIV-uninfected women (relative hazard, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.6–1.1), while the incidence of central lipohypertrophy did not differ by HIV status. Of HIV-infected women with 2 of 4 lipodystrophy outcomes, most (81%) had combined peripheral and central lipoatrophy or combined peripheral and central lipohypertrophy. Only 14% of these women had both peripheral lipoatrophy and central lipohypertrophy

Conclusions

These prospective data suggest that lipoatrophy, affecting both peripheral and central sites, predominates in HIV-infected women. The simultaneous occurrence of peripheral lipoatrophy and central lipohypertrophy was uncommon.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles