Transmission Behaviors of Recently HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex With Men

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Objectives:

Analyze postdiagnosis behaviors of recently HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM).

Methods:

Recently HIV-infected MSM were interviewed at 6 weeks (n = 153) and 3 months (n = 113) after diagnosis. Behaviors from baseline to follow-up were compared; multivariate logistic regression identified associations between baseline characteristics and behavior at follow-up.

Results:

At follow-up, MSM reported a significantly lower mean of partners (7.9 vs. 5.2) and lower means of 1-time (1.9 vs. 0.8), unknown (3.7 vs. 2.6), and acquaintance (1.1 vs. 0.5) partners than at baseline. In multivariate analyses, unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) with the last partner at follow-up was more likely if the last partner at baseline was a main partner (odds ratio [OR] = 2.94, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04 to 8.33) or HIV-positive partner (OR = 3.36, 95% CI: 1.27 to 8.88) but less likely if, at follow-up, the last partner was HIV-negative (OR = 0.28, 95% CI: 0.08 to 1.00) or of unknown HIV status (OR = 0.23, 95% CI: 0.08 to 0.71), the participant had a history of nonconsensual sex (OR = 0.25, 95% CI: 0.09 to 0.72), or the participant had more than 1 partner (OR = 0.28, 95% CI: 0.09 to 0.86). More than 1 partner at follow-up was associated with no main partner at baseline or follow-up (OR = 2.76, 95% CI: 1.12 to 6.78), more partners in the last 12 months (OR = 1.02, 95% CI: 1.01 to 1.04), and UAI with the last partner (OR = 0.36, 95% CI: 0.14 to 0.90).

Conclusions:

After diagnosis, some but not all recently HIV-infected MSM reduced risky sexual behavior permitting potential HIV transmission.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles