Long-term Results and Prognostic Factors of Underlay Myringoplasty in Pars Tensa Atelectasis in Children

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Abstract

IMPORTANCE

Pars tensa retraction is a frequent condition in chronic otitis media, and there is a large diversity of opinions regarding its management.

OBJECTIVE

To report the long-term results and prognostic factors of myringoplasty in pediatric patients with grade 5 pars tensa atelectasis.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS

This was an observational, retrospective case review, conducted at a referral university hospital, of children undergoing surgical intervention for dry tympanic disruption after a clinical history of tensa retraction with a transcanal or postauricular approach under general anesthesia.

INTERVENTIONS

Underlay myringoplasty with temporalis fascia or tragal perichondrium by transcanal or postauricular approach under general anesthesia.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES

Anatomical results are reported with a minimum follow-up of 5 years analyzing perforation or retraction of the neotympanum. Age; sex; side, position, and size of the eardrum disruption; surgical approach; graft material; and presence of contralateral disease were correlated with anatomical failure.

RESULTS

The population included 33 girls and 28 boys undergoing 65 interventions; the age varied from 4 to 16 years (mean [SD], 10 [3.2] years). An intact tympanic membrane was obtained in 58 cases (89.2%) with a follow-up varying from 5 to 14 years (mean follow-up, 9 years). None of the variables analyzed significantly predisposed patients to tympanic perforation after surgical repair. There were no new progressive retractions.

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE

Tensa retraction resulting in a tympanic disruption can be cured by underlay myringoplasty with perichondrium or temporalis fascia with results similar to those of simple tympanic perforations without recurrent retraction even in the long-term period.

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