The stability and causal effects of task-specific and generalized self-efficacy in college


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Abstract

This research investigated the stability and causal effects of task-specific self-efficacy and generalized self-efficacy in college students. In Study 1, task-specific self-efficacy and generalized self-efficacy scales were administered to university students (N = 237) on two occasions, with an interval of 2 months. In Study 2, task-specific (care-work) self-efficacy and generalized self-efficacy scales were administered to college students who were studying to be care workers (N = 49) on three occasions (before the first care-work practicum, after the practicum, and 3 months later). The results of both studies indicated that generalized self-efficacy was more stable than task-specific self-efficacy. In Study 1, both generalized self-efficacy and task-specific self-efficacy affected each other in daily life. Study 2 examined the effects of an ego-engaged experience (the first care-work practicum) for task-specific (care-work) self-efficacy and generalized self-efficacy. The results indicated that changes in care-work self-efficacy did not affect generalized self-efficacy.

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