Family-Supportive Organization Perceptions and Organizational Commitment: The Mediating Role of Work–Family Conflict and Enrichment and Partner Attitudes

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Abstract

The present study aims to explain the processes through which family-supportive organizational perceptions (FSOP) relate to employee affective commitment. We suggest multiple mechanisms through which this relationship transpires—(a) the focal employee’s experience of work-to-family conflict and enrichment and (b) the attitudes of the employee’s spouse/partner. Hypotheses are tested with data from 408 couples. Results suggest that employee FSOP is positively associated with employee commitment through both employee work-to-family experiences and partner attitudes. FSOP was positively related to employee work-to-family enrichment, which was positively associated with employee affective commitment. FSOP was negatively associated with employee work-to-family conflict, which related to a partner’s more positive attitude toward the employee’s work schedule and higher commitment to the employee’s firm. Partner commitment was positively and reciprocally related to employee affective commitment. These relationships partially mediated the FSOP-employee affective commitment relationship and varied as a function of parental status and single- versus dual-earner couple status but not as a function of employee gender. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

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