Reporting and documentation of adverse drug reactions by health care professionals at a Kenyan public hospital: a best practice implementation project

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Abstract

Background

Adverse drug reactions are a major cause of medicine-related morbidity and mortality, hospital admissions and increased health care costs. A majority, at least 60%, of adverse drug reactions are preventable. Reporting and documentation of adverse drug reactions is therefore critical to their prevention and management significantly improving patient safety, patient outcomes and patient care.

Objectives

The broad objective of the project was to implement evidence-based best practice in the reporting and documentation of adverse drug reactions by health care professionals at a Kenyan public hospital.

Methods

The project was designed as a Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System best practice implementation project constituting three phases; audit design and baseline audit, implementation of best practice and post-implementation audit. Barriers and strategies to best practice were identified and implemented respectively in phase two.

Results

This project resulted in significant improvements in practice as demonstrated by the follow-up audit. Improvement varied across the criteria from 1% to 100%. Great improvement was observed in all criteria except in reporting of adverse drug reactions.

Conclusions

The project resulted in significant improvements in practice relating to the reporting and documentation of adverse drug reactions in this setting. Further work needs to be carried out to sustain and improve upon the results obtained by this project.

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