The Relationship Between Social Deprivation and the Incidence of Adult Fractures

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Abstract

Background:

Social deprivation is associated with many diseases. To our knowledge, there has been no previous investigation of its role in the epidemiology and incidence of fractures in adults.

Methods:

We analyzed 6872 consecutive fractures in patients fifteen years of age or older over a one-year period. Social deprivation was analyzed using the Carstairs score, which is derived from patients’ postal codes and accurately defines social deprivation in our population.

Results:

Social deprivation is associated with an increasing fracture incidence. The effect is not linear, and the most deprived 10% of society are affected. The odds ratios of the most deprived 10% of society having an increased incidence of fractures are 3.7 in males and 3.1 in females.

Conclusions:

Social deprivation is associated with a significant increase in the incidence of fractures in the most deprived 10% of the population. Most fracture types are affected.

Level of Evidence:

Prognostic Level I. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

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